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Whose Responsibility Is It?

A recent court ruling against Domino's Pizza highlights a disparity in website and app accessibility. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a Domino's Pizza appeal, making way for a lawsuit against the pizza chain that its website was not accessible to the visually-impaired. Because there are no laws in the U.S. requiring compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines ...

The Decision is In

The Supreme Court of the United States has denied a petition from pizza giant Domino’s to hear whether its website is required to be accessible to the disabled, leaving in place a lower court decision against the company. The decision not to grant the case is a loss for the Domino’s and a win for disability advocates, who have argued ...

We’re Still Waiting for the Supreme Court to Rule on the ADA

Should companies be sued if disabled people can't access their apps and websites? What about if they can access only certain parts? Depending on which side you’re on, the issue is a matter of civil rights or it’s just a pretext for lawyers to shake down innocent businesses. It now appears that the United States Supreme Court could step in ...

MediaWire is WCAG 2.1 AA Compliant! What Does This Mean?

To explain the WCAG and how these guidelines are developed and implemented, this information was taken from the great resource w3.org. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) develops international Web standards: HTML, CSS, and many more. W3C’s Web standards are called W3C Recommendations. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are developed through the W3C process in cooperation with individuals and international ...

A Refresher on Accessibility Basics

What is “accessibility” as it pertains to websites? It is generally understood that  when we say a website is accessible, we mean that the site's content is available, and its functionality can be operated by everyone. As a person without a disability it's easy to assume that all users can see and use a keyboard, mouse, or touch screen, and ...

How the DAISY Standard and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Work Together

Players in all areas of publishing including trade publishing, independent publishing, and non-traditional publishing such as publishing internally within corporations, or university presses, all understand that there is a need for published content to be as accessible as possible, to as many people as possible. Because in the United States the laws regulating discrimination against people with disabilities encompassed by ...

One In Five People Still Don’t Use Digital Technology!

Unbelievably, approximately twenty percent of disabled adults in the United Kingdom have not used the Web, and in the United States, disabled Americans are about three times as likely as those without a disability to say they never go online (23% vs. 8%), according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in the fall of 2016. Equal access to information ...

Getting to Know DAISY

What is DAISY? According to their website, DAISY is an acronym for Digital Accessible Information SYstem and the original concept for DAISY was born from the need for accessible audio that could be used by individuals unable to read print, as easily and efficiently as a sighted person uses a printed book. DAISY began in the early 1990s and at ...

When Will the Litigation Stop?

In the United States alone it’s estimated that the annual discretionary spending of people with disabilities is over $490 billion. With that type of money in play, should we even be asking the question “Should websites be accessible to everyone, including the blind?” Surprisingly, this is still a topic for debate. This article from Gizmodo is a very good overview ...