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The Latest Numbers Show Mobile Apps Dominating the Mobile Web

In a recent report by analytics provider Flurry, it was shown the percentage of time spent on the mobile Web dropped to 14% in the first three months of this year, from 20% in the same period a year ago, and time spent on native apps rose to 86% from 80%.

Flurry collected data by tracking activity on more than 400,000 apps on more than 1.3 billion mobile devices across the globe.

The time now spent on all devices is increasing every year, to almost three hours per day right now, and that time is divided thus: almost 2.3 hours on apps and only .3 hour on the mobile web. The numbers speak for themselves. “The data tells a clear story that apps, which were considered a mere fad a few years ago, are completely dominating mobile, and the browser has become a single application swimming in a sea of apps,” said Flurry CEO Simon Khalaf.

Today’s mobile device user is ignoring web browsing in favor of spending more time on mobile apps than ever before, and mobile apps are no longer a fad. “The data tells a clear story that apps are completely dominating mobile, and the browser has become a single application swimming in a sea of apps,” he writes.

Business man use mobile phone with colorful application icons

The report shows that gaming apps are the most used software, grabbing up 32 percent of user’s time. Social networks and messaging apps, including Facebook, jumped from 24 percent prior to January, to 28 percent by the end of March. Entertainment software such as YouTube maintained prior use level of 8 percent while productivity apps doubled.

Because consumers are now spending so much time on mobile apps, it makes sense that the tech giants are scrambling to acquire smaller app companies. According to Flurry, Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram in 2012 has helped the social network maintain a big mobile presence. And, this will likely be the case with Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp too. Other mergers are in the works, and only time will tell which players remain standing.